About Our House

We purchased our current home in September of 2007. It’s a 1915 2-story Colonial Revival house that sits on about 3.5 acres in the middle of town, overlooking the Mississippi River.Front of House

We don’t know a lot of details about the history of the house, but here’s what we do know: the story is that the house was built sometime around 1915 by a banker who embezzled money from the bank in order to build it. He was found out (and presumably sent to jail) before he moved into the house, so he never spent any time living here. The first family to actually call the house home owned one of the local manufacturing companies located just down the river from the house. We think a couple generations of that family lived in the house until sometime around the 1950s or 1960s when it was sold. From there, the people we bought the house from said they thought it had changed hands two or three times before they bought it in 1985. At the time they bought it, it was in a state of sad disrepair, but they put a lot of effort into it over the next 22 years, touching every room in the house and making some pretty major updates before we bought it in 2007.

We believe that the basic footprint of the house has been unchanged since it was built, although we know that some changes have taken place inside of the house. For one, there used to be a back staircase to the second floor that has been closed off in favor of a pantry on the main floor and a small bathroom on the second floor. We also think that our sun room used to be a screened-in porch and that the part of the master bedroom that is over the sun room used to be a sleeping porch for the hot nights before air conditioning. The bathroom that is now our master bathroom looks as though it was one time a hall bathroom (with access from another bedroom, which has since been closed off). We also think there’s been some work done on the second floor to change the configuration of a couple of the bedrooms, but we aren’t sure exactly how they used to be.

Outside, we have some remnants of the original landscaping in the form of old growth trees and a row of peonies on either side of the driveway that the previous owners say are nearing 70 years old. There have also been some changes over the years. The building that used to be a horse stable has been extended into a detached garage (complete with basement). An in-ground swimming pool was added sometime in the 70s, and a large deck was added to the side yard, creating a great space for entertaining.

One other change has to do with the street access to the house. When it was built, the house faced the Mississippi River, with a sidewalk below the hill and several flights of stairs leading up to the front door. Since then, some lots have been sold off at the bottom of the hill, with new houses built on them and our house has no access from what used to be the front. The flights of stairs up the hill remain, but the main access to the house is on the side that used to be the back, which is why it looks so much less formal than your average colonial revival home. Here’s a photo of the front of the house as it was built:

Back of House

3 thoughts on “About Our House

  1. Barney says:

    I enjoyed reading your Blog. I happen to have an X720, with snow blower attachment, and I would like to get a link to the site for the rubber or plastic snow plow skids that you are using to avoid marking up the driveway. I have to agree with you that despite the wheel weight, the tractor usually needs snow chains for proper traction. Its always embarrasing to be seen pushing an expensive piece of equipment to get to a spot where it will move again. I have the driveway sealed yearly, so if it gets bad enough, I put the chains on, because I find the sealant hides the chain markings. I just have to avoid any real skidding, to damage the driveway w/chains. I also have stored in my data bank the information regarding the defective fuse. I try almost anything to avoid a service call on my machine, especially after watching them, I see it was something I could have done myself, but didn’t know. Thanks, and if you have a link to that site, I would appreciate it. Expecting snow up he in southeast
    Pennsylvania, and I have the tractor ready to go.
    Thanks,
    Barney

  2. Sarah says:

    Hi Barney,

    We bought the Robalon skid shoes for the snow blower from this website:
    http://www.sepw.com/SearchResult.aspx?CategoryID=97

    The ones we ordered were part number A150BS, but there are several varieties available depending on the snowblower you have.

    Hope this helps!
    -Sarah

  3. thatssocute says:

    The Waltons!!

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